Tag: which

Etymology, English, Appear

Etymology From Middle English apperen, aperen, borrowed from Old French aparoir (French apparoir, apparaître), from Latin appāreō (“I appear”), from ad (“to”) + pāreō (“I come forth, I become visible”), from Proto-Italic *pāzēō, from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂-s- (“watch, see”), s-present of *peh₂- (“protect”).…

Etymology, English, Likely

Etymology From Middle English likely, likly, lykly, likliche, from Old English ġelīclīċ (“likely”) and Old Norse líkligr (“likely”), both from Proto-Germanic *līkalīkaz, equivalent to like +‎ -ly.   Adjective likely (comparative likelier or more likely, superlative likeliest or most likely) probable; having a greater-than-even chance of occurring Rain is likely later…

Etymology, English, Type

Etymology From Middle English type (“symbol, figure, emblem”), from Latin typus, from Ancient Greek τύπος (túpos, “mark, impression, type”), from τύπτω (túptō, “I strike, beat”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tewp-, extended from *(s)tew- (“to push, hit”).…

Etymology, English, Reach

Etymology  Verb. From Middle English rechen, from Old English rǣċan (“to reach”), from Proto-West Germanic *raikijan, from Proto-Germanic *raikijaną, from the Proto-Indo-European *reyǵ- (“to bind, reach”).   Verb reach (third-person singular simple…

Etymology, English, Separate

Etymology From Latin separatus, perfect passive participle of separare (“to separate”), from Latin sē- (“apart”) +‎ parō (“prepare”). Displaced Middle English scheden, from Old English scēadan (whence English shed). Pronunciation (adjective, noun) IPA(key): /ˈsɛpɹət/, /ˈsɛpəɹət/ (verb) IPA(key): /ˈsɛpəɹeɪt/