Category: English

Etymology, English, Brusque

Etymology The adjective is borrowed from French brusque, from Italian brusco (“abrupt, sudden, brusque; brisk; eager; sour, tart; unripe; grim-looking”); further etymology unknown. The verb is derived from the adjective. Pronunciation (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɹʊsk/, /bɹuːsk/, /bɹʌsk/ (General American) IPA(key): /bɹʌsk/ Rhymes: -ʌsk Adjective brusque (comparative brusquer or more brusque, superlative brusquest or most brusque) Rudely abrupt; curt, unfriendly.…

Etymology, English, Ottawa

Etymology Said to be from Ojibwe odaawaa (“traders”)/ᐅᑡᐙ. Pronunciation[edit] (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɒtəwə/ (General American, Canada) IPA(key): /ˈɑtəwə/, /ˈɑtəˌwɑ/ Proper noun Ottawa An Algonquian people closely related to the Ojibwe; also spelt Ottowa. The Ottawa dialect of Ojibwe; also spelt Odawa or Odaawaa. A city in Ontario, Canada; capital city of Canada.…

Etymology, English, War

Etymology From Middle English werre, from Late Old English werre, wyrre (“armed conflict”) from Old Northern French werre (compare Old French guerre, whence modern French guerre), from Medieval Latin werra, from Frankish *werru (“confusion; quarrel”), from Proto-Indo-European *wers- (“to mix up, confuse, beat, thresh”). Displaced native Old English ġewinn. Akin to Old High German werra (“confusion, strife,…

Etymology, English, Louse

Etymology From Middle English lous, lows, lowse, from Old English lūs, from Proto-Germanic *lūs (compare West Frisian lûs, Dutch luis, German Low German Luus, German Laus), from Proto-Indo-European *lewH- (compare Welsh llau (“lice”), Tocharian B luwo, maybe Sanskrit यूका (yūkā)). Pronunciation (UK) IPA(key): /laʊs/ Rhymes: -aʊs Noun louse (plural lice or louses) A small parasitic wingless insect of the order Psocodea. (colloquial, dated, not usually used in plural form) A contemptible person; one who…

Etymology, English, Santa Claus

Etymology Borrowed from Dutch Sinterklaas (“Saint Nicholas”), from Middle Dutch sinter clâes, probably from sint (“saint”) +‎ Claes (shortened form of Nicolaas).[1][2] The -er in the first component is of uncertain origin. Suggested to be due to the influence of other saints’…